Monthly Archives: June 2013

Table of Contents for Monograph’s First Draft

I am now starting on the second draft of my book (and the book proposal). To get an idea of where I am with this work, I am posting the table of contents for the first draft here.

Table of Contents

Introduction 7

The existential condition and the experiential condition 11

Time, ontology and error 14

Possible worlds and experience 16

 

Chapter 1: The Importance of Metaphysics 19

Serious metaphysics is physicalism? 20

Experiential error 22

Target audience 24

Fundamentalist positions on the mind and experience 25

The scope of physicalism 30

Ignoring the metaphysical debate 30

Belief, appearance, and reality 33

Conclusion 34

Chapter 2: The Modes of Experience 36

Reports of alien encounters 36

The need for a definition of experience and its structure 39

Defining experience 41

Perception and experience 41

Are there non-perceptual but experiential illusions? 44

Temporal experience and illusions 44

Appearance and experience 48

Naïve Realism 50

Conclusion 53

Chapter 3: The Structure of Experience 54

The Hard Problem and the Easy Problems 54

Ontologically-committed experience 56

Extended and embedded experience 58

Experience is extended AND embedded 58

Against absolutely extended or embedded mental entities 59

Extended/embedded in the environment 60

Constitution 62

Intrinsic and extrinsic Relations 63

Causal relations 65

The experiential relation 66

Representationalism 68

Having an experience and what is experienced 71

Conclusion 73

Chapter 4: The Metaphysics of Time 75

Temporal passage 76

Unreal time 78

Presentism and Eternalism 80

Tense and Tenseless Theory 81

The A-Theory and the B-theory 81

A/B-theory and Presentism/Eternalism 84

Tense Theory and Tenseless/Detenser theory 84

Static and dynamic 85

Chapter 5: Relativity 89

Relativity in general 89

Relativity, subjectivity and objectivity 90

Special Relativity: The train and the platform 93

Arbitrary inertial frames 94

Relative space and time 95

Exceptions to relativity 96

Space-time intervals 97

Consequences for the temporal structure of experience 98

Errors absolute and relative 102

Conclusion 104

Chapter 6: Perceiving the Spatial World 106

Naïve commitments from the phenomenology of perception 107

Directly perceiving the real and external 112

Spatial relations and the past 113

Where are past things? 115

Concepts of time and spatial relations 117

Presentism 118

Tense Theory 118

Tenseless Theory 121

Conclusion 121

Chapter 7: The Process in Perceiving External Things 123

The relevant phenomenological description 124

Different meanings of ‘present’ 125

Perceiving and what we perceive 128

The process in perceiving external things 130

Conclusion 140

Chapter 8: Perceptual Limits and Appearances 142

Limited perception 144

Amodal perception 145

Amodal discrepancies between appearance and reality 149

Appearance of representation and illusion 150

Is there a paradox of amodality? 152

Imagination 153

Imagining and causal chains 154

Imagining and remembering 155

MacPherson 156

Noë 157

Imagination, illusion and experiential modes 158

Modal illusion 159

Illusion and the reality of ‘presence-in-absence’ 160

Conclusion 161

Interlude 162

Chapter 9: Apparent Depth 165

Seeing out there what’s not out there 166

Apparent depth 168

Is depth apparent? 170

Stereopsis 173

Seeing through empty space 175

Is apparent depth the same as real depth? 176

Chapter 10: The Distortion of Hidden Depths 179

The ‘Bent Stick Illusion’ 181

The process in perception 182

Medium 183

Uncommon appearance 183

Cubist vision 185

‘Straight in front of you’ 188

Defining visual depth in real space 189

Mirages 190

Straight lines, tangents and circumferences 193

Defining ‘straight’ by a reference frame 194

Conclusion 197

 

Chapter 11: Illusion 200

Illusion and hallucination 203

Illusion 207

Conflationary errors in experience 209

Conclusion 211

Chapter 12: Hallucination 212

The object of hallucination 213

Hallucinated things vs. Internal things 214

Hallucinated things are NOT THERE 216

NOT THERE is not ‘somewhere else’ 216

What is an ‘apparent’ object? 218

Complex illusions 218

Property-bearers 219

Sortal Illusions 222

No instances 224

Conclusion 225

Chapter 13: Anosognosia 227

Experience seems to be limited 229

WYSIATI: What You See is All There Is 230

Defining anosognosia 232

Change blindness 233

Anosognosia: not illusion or hallucination 234

Anosognosia of O being F is not appearance of O being F 235

Unawareness in Anosognosia 236

Chapter 14: Comparing Illusion, Hallucination and Anosognosia 238

Choosing the Error 241

Interchanging illusion and anosognosia 242

Interchanging hallucination and anosognosia 245

Is Anosognosia better than illusion or hallucination? 247

Ontology of erroneous modes 249

Apparent totality 250

Responding to counter-claims of veridical experience 252

Conclusion 253

Chapter 15: Anosognosia and Previous Discussions 255

Figment: ‘filling-in’ and mental paint 255

Relative as absolute 257

Mirages 260

Conflation and anosognosia 263

Geometric-Optical Illusions (GOI) 264

‘Magic’ 267

Conclusion 268

Chapter 16: Erroneous Experiences of Time 270

Temporal Experience 271

Putting aside Retention Theory 272

Memory-experience 273

Temporal illusion 276

Temporal anosognosia 280

Temporal hallucination 281

Using these distinctions with experiences of time 282

Time-lag and erroneous temporal experience 283

‘Where’ depends on ‘When’ 286

Evidence of both temporal anosognosia and Temporal illusion 287

(a) Simultaneity and duration 287

(b) Tenses 288

Eliminating temporal properties 289

Timelessness 292

Conclusion 296

Chapter 17: Modes of Experience and Hallucination 300

Eliminating hallucination 301

Other errors need an object 304

Not hallucination; imagination 305

Not hallucination; internal perception 307

Not hallucination; misperception of oneself 309

Not hallucination; memory 311

Memory-experience and indirect realism 313

Conclusion 315

Chapter 18: Eternalism and Hallucination 318

Direct realist alternatives to hallucination 319

Distinguishing memory and perception given Eternalism 321

Reminders 322

Eternalism and the ‘Where’ in ‘There’ 322

Temporal conflation 322

Causal dependency 322

Phenomenological distinctions 324

Delayed perception as an explanation of alleged hallucination 328

Objection: No sensory stimulus 331

The Age of Sunlight 331

Neural Delays in Perception 332

Unique Extended Temporal Point-of-View 333

Conclusion 338

Conclusion 339

Bibliography

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Next: Anosognosia

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